Learner drivers scare their parents rigid

Learner Drivers Scare Their Parents Rigid

A study has revealed that 41 per cent of parents are frightened at the thought of their offspring driving them around when they’re learning, with 42 per cent admitting to forgetting the highway code themselves. Motoring journalist, Tim Barnes-Clay, reports.

Stress

For mums and dads who courageously take up the job of driving instructor, nearly one in five outings resulted in a damaged motor, along with a quarter admitting to having ‘lost the plot’ when sitting in the tutor’s seat. Furthermore, despite over 53 per cent of kids believing dad is a cooler driver than mum, 20 per cent of driving lessons with dad instructing has resulted in an accident. This is compared with only eight per cent for mothers.

Dream Instructors

The study, looking at the motoring practises of 1,000 teenagers and their folks, showed that while 57 per cent of parents can’t wait for their youngsters to be able to drive, 52 per cent wouldn’t have faith in themselves as their mentor. When it comes to dream driving instructors, Lewis Hamilton takes the top spot, with 21 per cent of teens wanting personal lessons with the racing champ. Prince Harry is popular, too (8.5%) followed by the larger-than-life James Corden (7.3%) and then, crooner, Ed Sheeran (10%).

O.M.G!

The research, carried out by Vauxhall Motors, even revealed that 11 per cent of mums would rather give birth again than have their child drive them around. And the same number of dads would go for a bungee jump instead.

Confidence

It comes as no surprise that 27 per cent of teens wouldn’t have confidence in either of their parents instructing them how to drive. And 70 per cent reckon they’d be a better motorist than their parents if they pass their test with expert tuition. Regardless of their self-assurance, 52 per cent believe it’s more nail-biting than school exams and 45 per cent think it’s more nerve-wracking than a first date.

Comment

Commenting on the survey, Denis Chick, of Vauxhall Motors, said: “As a dad-of-three, I’ve spent much of my life transporting my youngsters around. I wouldn’t say I’ve had a meltdown teaching them, but when it comes to learning, we think it’s wisest to leave it to the professionals. As the research has shown, it seems most parents agree. We want our children to be safe on the road, and the Young Driver courses are a perfect way to experience being behind the wheel of a car before doing the real thing on the road.”

Partnership

The study was done to signal the new collaboration between Vauxhall Motors and Young Driver, the world’s most comprehensive driving education programme that teaches five to 17 year olds.