Ford to spend £2.1 million on young driver training

Ford to Spend 2.1 Million on Young Driver Training
Ford Motor Company today announced it will invest another £2.1m in 2016 to provide free driver training to 7,000 18- to 24-year-olds across Europe.

Driving skills for life

Ford has now committed a total of £7.1 million on training through its acclaimed Ford Driving Skills for Life (DSFL) programme in Europe since 2013. This year, Ford will offer the free driver training for the first time in Finland and Poland, and continue to provide training in the UK, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Romania, Russia, Spain and Turkey.

Driving dangers

Car crashes are the leading cause of death for Europeans aged 18 to 24-year-olds. Ford has already trained 13,500 novice drivers in Europe, providing free, hands-on classes covering hazard recognition, vehicle handling, and speed and space management. The programme also highlights the risks posed by social media distractions such as texting and taking selfies at the wheel, as well as the dangers of drinking and driving, or driving after taking drugs.

“Too many young adults are dying in car crashes caused by a combination of inexperience and poor decision making,” said Jim Graham, manager, Ford DSFL. “With this new £2.1 million investment in young driver training for 2016, we can provide a further 7,000 young people with the skills and knowledge that could help save their lives.”

Awareness

Ford is enlisting YouTubers from across Europe to help raise awareness of the issues of young driver road safety throughout 2016 with a series of videos and events. Follow the link to see people experience Ford DSFL for the first time https://youtu.be/o0V69yD0HPM– including the disorientating Drug Driving Suit.

“Newly qualified drivers still have so much to learn about safety on the road so we strongly urge young drivers to take advantage of Ford DSFL training,” Graham said. “It’s fun, free, informative, and because we constantly re-evaluate what we teach, it’s always relevant.”