London is the most expensive city to park in | Car News, Reviews & Buyers Guides

London is the most expensive city to park in

December 31, 2013 by Perrys Content Team in News

This is according to ParkatmyHouse.com, which has researched many popular cities around the world.

New car or used car owners in London are required to pay more on average for parking then motorists in cities including Tokyo (£38), Stockholm (£32), Zurich (£31) and Sydney (£29). These other locations round up the remaining top five most expensive cities to park.

The next five most expensive cities for parking your car on average include New York (£28), Paris (£26), Hong Kong (£25), Hamburg (£19) and Brussels (£16).

Not only do motorists in London pay the most for parking, but they have to keep in mind where exactly they park to avoid paying far more than the average sum. In recent times the city has introduced new commercial car parks in the West End and City of London, where drivers are charged £75 a day.

The high price for parking in London particularly sticks out when you compared it to other cities in the UK. Further research information from ParkatmyHouse.com shows that the average price for parking in Manchester is £12 per day, while it is £10 per day in Birmingham.

Speaking of lower costs, over in Cole Street, Scunthorpe motorists pay just an average £3.50 a day for parking.

London meanwhile not only has the highest average parking cost globally but also possesses the single most expensive parking space in the world. A parking slot in Mayfair was sold last August for no less than £300,000.

Furthermore, a luxury car park in Knightsbridge offers car parking spaces for £13,000 a year. These particular bays are not like your average parking slots, however, as they are extra-wide and come with padded pillars, full security and a monthly valet.

Earlier this year the debate on local parking congestion was reignited when Local Transport Minister, Norman Baker, urged councils across England to take up the use of restricted parking zones. The thinking behind this is that they’ll replace the conventional yellow lines most commonly used to control parking these days.

If councils do choose to implement restricted parking zones over yellow lines, it would have a large effect on parking across the country. It would mean that a limited number of signs will tell motorists whether or not they can park in an area, plus what times they are allowed to park.

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