Get Enough Sleep Before Driving

September 12, 2017 by Perrys Content Team in Buyers Guides

Perrys is encouraging motorists to make sure they get enough sleep before driving.

Fatal Mistakes

Research from the USA has revealed that between 15 and 33 per cent of deadly crashes involve drowsy drivers, and that four per cent of Americans confess to having snoozed while behind the wheel. In addition, fresh figures from Ireland suggest that fatigue is a factor in 20 per cent of driver fatalities.

Save Yourself With Sleep

Perrys’ motoring journalist, Tim Barnes-Clay, says: “Being a safer motorist means being fully prepared to drive. If we all got the amount of shut-eye we require, there would be fewer accidents, less near-smashes and fewer road rage clashes. Well-refreshed motorists are more likely to stay attentive; they see risks developing sooner and they can respond to them quickly.”

Performance

Tim continued: “We all feel on the ball when we wake up after a good night’s kip, and our reaction times are swifter. We retain information better, our moods are better and we perform better, after a decent sleep.”

Pressures

The motoring journalist added: “Conversely, tiredness among motorists is one of our biggest public health dangers. Work pressures can keep many people wide-awake at night, yet the same pressures necessitate them to be out early in the morning, driving. Sleep deprivation makes people irrational and moody. That’s why road rage confrontations in the morning rush hour are likely to relate to drivers who basically didn’t get a proper night’s sleep.”

Top Tips

Perrys offers the following guidance for avoiding the hazards associated with tiredness:

  • Get a good night’s sleep every night and certainly before you need to make a road trip.
  • Depriving yourself of sleep for just a couple of hours can lead to moodiness and can also increase the likelihood of taking ridiculous risks.
  • Feeling dozy in the middle of the day doesn’t make you idle – for most people it’s a natural part of the daily cycle of wakefulness and sleep.
  • Taking a short siesta during the working day may not be an option for everyone, but it’s better than relying on stimulating drinks to keep wide-awake.
  • For driving, tiredness is a major risk, so don’t begin a lengthy journey if you’re already shattered.
  • If you feel drowsy while driving, then stop as soon as it’s safe to do so. Resting and drinking some coffee offers a potential short-term remedy.
  • The only 100 per cent cure for tiredness is good sleep.

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