Europe Mustn't Lag Behind In Car Safety | Car News, Reviews & Buyers Guides

Europe Mustn’t Lag Behind In Car Safety

March 22, 2016 by Perrys Content Team in News

Responding to the European Transport Safety Council’s (ETSC) call for an overhaul of the European car safety framework, Thatcham Research supports the need for regulatory intervention to ensure that lifesaving technologies are standard on all vehicles.

Automated Emergency Braking

However, it could also be achieved voluntarily by the EU automotive industry, according to Thatcham Research’s Chief Executive, Peter Shaw: “Last week, the U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), along with 20 vehicle manufacturers, agreed to make  Automated Emergency Braking (AEB) standard on all vehicles in the US by 2022.

“These are major landmarks for vehicle safety, with the US leading the way. Europe risks falling behind. Unless we have a similar agreement amongst European vehicle manufacturers, legislation is the only way to go.”

Life Saver

Research has shown that vehicles fitted with AEB are capable of reducing the likelihood of front to rear crashes by up to 40% and at the current fitment rate has the potential to save 1,130 lives and 126,000 casualties over the next 10 years.

Analysis by Thatcham Research shows that only 2% of vehicles currently on the road in the UK have AEB as standard fit. This figure is growing, but not fast enough – with only 17% of new vehicles available to buy having AEB as standard fit.

A recent survey conducted by Thatcham Research and Direct Line Insurance Group in the UK, also revealed that 82% of drivers think car safety features like AEB should be fitted as standard and available for free. Not as an “extra”.

Collaboration

“We recognise that many vehicle manufacturers have really upped their game in the past few years when it comes to car safety. They are pioneering new technologies. However, if AEB as standard on all vehicles is going to become a reality in Europe, it is going to require collaboration between regulators and everyone in the automotive industry,” concludes Shaw.

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